efani – A Comprehensive Guide on Silent SMS Denial of Service (DoS) Attack

When delivered to a mobile handset, silent messages, also known as Silent SMS or Stealth SMS “stealth ping”, or “Short Message Type 0”, are not indicated on the display or by an acoustic alert signal. This guide will concentrate on the technicalities of sending a silent SMS, as well as sending multiple incessant silent SMSs to perform a silent SMS denial of service (DoS) attack. These silent messages are increasingly being sent not only to perform DoS attacks but also to force the constant update of users’ or victims’ location (tracking) information.

What is Silent SMS or Flash SMS?

Silent SMS was originally intended to allow operators to detect whether a mobile phone was turned on and test the network without informing the user. They have, however, proven useful in the tracking down of suspects by police in a number of countries.

Using the GSM Network, silent SMS can pinpoint the exact location of a mobile phone. We can find a user by identifying the three antennas closest to him and then triangulating the distance based on the time it takes for a signal to return. When a person moves, their phone’s location is updated; however, the information is not updated immediately. The location of the mobile is instantly updated when a Silent SMS is sent. This is extremely useful because it allows you to locate someone at a specific time based on the airwaves.

ICYMI – In cellular communication networks, the SS7 (Signaling System No. 7) protocols are critical. Unfortunately, SS7 has a number of flaws that a malicious actor can exploit to launch attacks. Location tracking, SMS interception, and other types of signaling attacks are significant examples of these.

[TIP: EFANI’s Black Seal Protection against such hacks such as SS7, location tracking, DDoS, Silent SMS, IMSI Catchers and so on]

The Silent SMS Denial of Service (DoS) attack is one of the more intriguing attacks. A typical DoS attack floods a network with excessive traffic, rendering its computer resources inaccessible to users. The same concept applies to mobile devices.

Source: Croft, N. J., & Olivier, M. S. (2007). A silent SMS denial of service (DoS) attack

The Silent SMS Denial of Service (DoS) attack is one of the more intriguing attacks. A typical DoS attack floods a network with excessive traffic, rendering its computer resources inaccessible to users. The same concept applies to mobile devices. Without the victim’s knowledge, a device can be flooded with silent SMS messages. Texts swamping the victim’s device will utilize the battery abnormally while preventing the device from receiving calls.

Targets Location Tracking

Malefactors who exploit SS7 protocol vulnerabilities frequently target location information and tracking. A silent SMS could be sent to the target mobile device to force it to update the existing (normally the closest) serving base station onto the mobile network in order to identify the target’s location.

The device user will not be notified if a message is received, as in a Silent SMS DoS attack. However, unlike a DoS attack, there are no visible signs that an attack is taking place. As a result, the victim is completely unaware that they are being followed.

SIM cards are also a major target because they use Wireless Internet Browsers (WIB), that are not adequately secured. Telecommunications companies use Over the Air (OTA) technology to communicate with WIBs in order to manage SIM cards.

Evil people can essentially send a silent SMS containing WIB instructions. The instructions are executed once they have been received on the victim’s device. At this point, the malefactor has several options, including obtaining location data, initiating a call, sending an SMS, or even launching a web browser with a particular URL.

The Culprit: Who is behind the Silent SMS attacks?

Though it has reportedly been used by authorities and governments in the past, the decreasing costs of equipment and broadband access have made this attack vector accessible to malefactors with little technical knowledge.

Why are silent SMS attacks so risky?

Cellular attacks that take advantage of the SS7 protocol are nothing new. However, due to the covert nature of silent SMS attacks, it is difficult to detect them before it is too late. As a result, silent SMS attacks are a compliance nightmare. A breach cannot be detected and, as a result, cannot be reported in accordance with the law. Invisible DoS attacks, OTA malware, and unauthorized location tracking are all dangerous, if not disastrous.

It is incumbent to bring this to readers’ attention that not only SS7 attacks are next to impossible to detect when they take place, but they also leave practically no traces in terms of forensics. The forensic investigator has little to no data to extract and analyze from the victim’s device.

This is, of course, unless the victim has an application on their mobile devices that is specifically supposed to detect and triangulate silent SMS.

The investigator may be able to examine the traffic on the cellular network and possibly detect the unprecedented number of messages sent. Sadly, the investigator must have the victim’s mobile in hand to confirm a real-time attack.

Who is vulnerable to a Silent SMS attack?

It is not critical for most users to have their location tracked or to lose wireless access due to a DoS attack. Attackers are most likely to target executives, VIPs, celebrities, crypto enthusiasts, and governments.

Attacks will almost certainly result in significant financial losses for enterprises, whereas national defense is at stake for governments. They must also consider the possible harm that could be accomplished if an attacker is able to install malware on the device by exploiting WIB vulnerabilities on SIM cards.

The much-needed protection

The one and only effective way to identify and prevent such attack vectors is at the network level (speaking of mobile here). This necessitates the use of EFANI’s Black Seal Protection aimed at “plugging” the security vulnerabilities left by the primitive SS7 protocol, which is still in use presently.

Currently, most of the defense against silent SMS DoS attacks is left to individuals (going through such emotional stress) and cybersecurity professionals in companies, who (unfortunately) have little or no tools to do so. For telecom companies since this pandemic means taking a global approach to SS7 protection. It thus necessitates the implementation of appropriate safeguards and security mechanisms to prevent their networks and registered user devices from such hacks.

Unfortunately, traditional cell phone companies are not doing much to protect you. But it is not all bad news, there is a cellular phone company named efani that has stepped up and made it more difficult for hackers. efani offers the nation’s most secure mobile service and claims a 100% success rate.

The SAFE plan comes with a 100% money-back guarantee for 60-days. and includes:

*11 Layer Proprietary Military Grade Security
*Unlimited Call/Text/Data within US/Canada & Mexico
*5G Access on America’s Largest & Fastest Network
*Wi-Fi Calling
*Keep your Current Number
*International Data-Roaming
*$5 Million Insurance Coverage (includes: Crypto, Banking, Brokerage & Other Losses)

Try efani RISK-FREE for 60 days with a 100% Money Back Guarantee!

Take action NOW and secure your assets, privacy, and your phone by calling toll free 1-833-693-3264 or visit the website below

efani Most Secure Mobile Phone Service Prevent Eavesdropping, Remote Access & Location Tracking SAFE Encrypted Secure Your Identity & Phone NOW AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Tracfone and US Mobile – are susceptible to SIM swap scams

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What is SIM swapping? What do you need to know? efani SAFE?

Did you know that the very same smartphone in your hand could potentially offer a cybercriminal a way to access your financial accounts? What’s more, your phone doesn’t even need to leave your possession for it to become a potential concern. All a cybercriminal needs are your phone number.

This type of fraud, known as SIM swapping, can be used as a way of taking over your bank accounts. And any other account that relies on phone-based authentication. Successful SIM swap fraud will see the cybercriminal taking over your mobile phone number and using it to gain access to the accounts and data that you may have believed to be secured.

How does it work?

Think about your bank account and the way in which you access it. To access your bank account, you will enter your username and your password. To verify that it is you attempting to access the account, the bank will send a one-time password (OTP) to your cell phone so that you can complete the process of logging in.

This process is typically efficient. And it does serve as an effective way of verifying that it’s you who is accessing the account. However, what if a bad actor was able to change the SIM card that is linked to your mobile phone number? In an instant, they now have the ability to get the OTP to your account.

This will give them control of your account, your finances, and so much more.

Understanding the SIM card

Also referred to as SIM splitting or simjacking, this type of fraud sees cybercriminals taking advantage of a vulnerability in two-factor authentication and verification. The subscriber identity module (SIM) card is the small card inside of your mobile phone that stores user data. It’s important to note that only GSM phones contain a SIM card, CDMA mobile phones do not use a removable SIM card.

The SIM card contains user data and authorizes the mobile phone to use the mobile network. This makes it a valuable asset to a would-be fraudster.

How it happens

In order to take control of your number, cybercriminals will begin with a bit of social engineering and gather as much personal info about you as they can. With this information on hand, they can then call your mobile carrier and impersonate you, with the claim of having lost or damaged the SIM card.

The customer service rep will activate a new SIM card that the fraudster already has in their possession. In an instant, this will port your mobile number to the fraudster’s device and the SIM they are using.

If your carrier has layers of security questions for you to answer, how then can cybercriminal access your account? All of the data that they gathered about you will prove to be useful here. This info could come through the use of malware on your device, the dark web, social media research, or phishing schemes.

With control over your mobile number, a fraudster can now access your text messages from banks and even online retailers that may have your financial details stored. They will be able to get any password reset codes that are sent to the phone, for any one of your connected accounts.

With that, they’re now able to access everything you access. Including your bank accounts.

Signs of SIM swap fraud

There are a few warning signs that may help you to recognize that you’ve fallen victim to a SIM swap scam.

  • Social media posts that are not your own. There have been cases where fraudsters have accessed the social media accounts of high-profile targets, with the goal of causing trouble.
  • If you’re unable to make calls or send text messages, this is a very strong indicator that your SIM card has been deactivated.
  • You are not able to access your bank account, credit card accounts, or email. If your login credentials suddenly all stop working, you should contact the relevant organization immediately to protect yourself.
  • Your mobile phone provider may notify you that your phone number or SIM card has been activated on a new device.

Can you protect against a SIM swap scam?

There are a few steps that you can take in order to help protect yourself against a fraudster swapping out your SIM card.

Unfortunately, traditional cell phone companies are not doing much to protect you. But it is not all bad news, there is a cellular phone company named efani that has stepped up and made it more difficult for hackers.

Replace your existing mobile service plan with a secure efani SAFE plan today, No Contract! efani is a secure mobile service with an encrypted SIM Card that secures your mobile account from potential SIM Swap vulnerabilities, your personal information, as well as $5M insurance coverage per individual in the event of loss as a result of a SIMSwap.

The SAFE plan comes with a 100% money-back guarantee for 60-days includes:

You’re protected up to $5 million for financial losses resulting from a SIM hack. (includes: Crypto, Banking, Brokerage & Other Losses)

Military-grade verification
An 11-step integrity and authentication check prevents SIM-swapping
No limits Coverage
Unlimited Calls Texts & Data within US Canada & Mexico

Secure your assets, privacy, and phone Toll-Free 1- (833) MY-EFANI that’s 1-833-693-3264 or visit the website at https://nonprofitforgood.us

Roblox Suing Player $1.6 million Fraud Breach Contract | efani Partner TheNFG.com

The lawsuit claims YouTuber leads a “cybermob” that terrorizes Roblox and its staff, seeks $1.6 million in damages

Roblox has filed a lawsuit against a player who was permanently banned from its platform, claiming he has been harassing and threatening both the company’s staff & events.

The complaint was filed in the Northern District of California court earlier this week, shared by Polygon, and is against Robert Simon, a content creator also known as Ruben Sim.

Roblox’s lawsuit centers around six counts, including fraud, breach of contract, and violation of the California Comprehensive Computer Data Access and Fraud Act.

The company is seeking $1.6 million in damages.

Roblox’s legal counsel described Simon as the “leader of a ‘cybermob’ that with malice, fraud, and oppression, commits and encourages unlawful acts designed to injure Roblox and its users.”

According to the lawsuit, Simon has gathered more than 760,000 subscribers to his YouTube channel since his ban, as well as over 24,000 Twitter followers, plus paid Patreon subscribers and followers on Discord and Reddit.

The lawsuit claims: “The focus of his social media content is targeted at spreading injurious content, including false accusations about Roblox, its employees, and other users. His social media followers have become a cult-like ‘cybermob’ that echoes Defendant Simon’s conduct and harassment of Roblox employees and users.”

The lawsuit claims Simon’s behavior involved posting fake terrorist threats against Roblox’s events, as well as glamorizing the 2018 shooting at YouTube’s headquarters and “threatening/taunting a copycat act of terrorism” against Roblox’s headquarters.

In one example, Simon reportedly posted tweets and messages about police “searching for [a] notorious Islamic Extremist” at last month’s Roblox Developers Conference 2021. He posted enough messages that the police did temporarily shut down the event.

Polygon reported these tweets have since been deleted.

Roblox claims the incident cost them $50,000 to investigate and secure the conference.

The lawsuit also accuses Simon of circumventing measures to enforce his ban and instructing other banned users on how to do so. He also has allegedly been cyber-bullying and harassing Roblox staff and management.

efani | Crypto Cell Phone SIM Port Hijacking Identity Theft

“SIM swapping” (also known as “SIM hijacking”) is a growing crime and form of identity theft in the telecommunications world that requires little more than a thorough Google search, a willing telecommunications carrier representative, and an electronic or in-person impersonation of the victim. To perpetuate the theft, the cellphone service provider allows an unauthorized person access to a wireless telephone account without the knowledge of the account holder. In several instances, SIM swap thieves have invaded victims’ bank accounts and stolen assets like cryptocurrency. Cryptocurrency, in fact, is one of the primary targets of SIM swapping thieves. As one of the nation’s leading advocates for cryptocurrency investors, we are uniquely skilled and prepared to assist victims of such theft in pursuing their claims and their efforts to recover their stolen assets.

A subscriber identity module, widely known as a “SIM card,” stores user data in cellular phones on the Global System for Mobile (GSM) network — the radio network used by companies such as AT&T and T-Mobile to provide cellular telephone service to their subscribers. SIM cards are principally used to authenticate cellphone subscriptions; as without a SIM card, GSM phones are not able to connect to AT&T’s or T-Mobile’s telecommunications network. Not only is a SIM card vital to using a phone on these networks, but the SIM card also holds immeasurable value as a tool to identify the user of the phone — a power that can be corrupted to steal the identity of that user. Silver Miller represents several victims in currently-active cases against AT&T and T-Mobile in this rapidly emerging area of theft and is investigating and evaluating additional claims against AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile — as well as their off-brand or sub-brand resellers Cricket Wireless, Boost Mobile, Virgin Mobile, and Metro PCS — at the present time.

efani.net News | T-Mobile to Settle 2020 Outage for $19.5 Million

T-Mobile USA agreed to settle a U.S. probe for $19.5 million after a massive 2020 outage led to more than 20,000 failed 911 emergency calls.

The settlement was prompted by a Federal Communications Commission investigation into a more than 12-hour outage in June 2020 that led to congestion across No. 3 wireless carrier T-Mobile’s networks, and caused “the complete failure of more than 23,000 911 calls.”

T-Mobile as part of the consent decree with the FCC has also agreed to make new commitments to improve 911 outage notices.

An October 2020 FCC report found the T-Mobile outage disrupted calling and texting services nationwide and access to data service in some areas. It resulted in at least 250 million total calls failing.

The FCC estimated “over 250 million calls … from other service providers’ subscribers to T-Mobile subscribers failed due to the outage” and “at least 41% of all calls that attempted to use T-Mobile’s network during the outage did not complete successfully.”

T-Mobile said Tuesday it has “built resiliency into our emergency systems to ensure that our 911 elements are available when they’re needed. Following this outage, we immediately took additional steps to further enhance our network to prevent this type of event from happening in the future.”

Then-FCC chairman Ajit Pai said the FCC staff report showed the company did not follow established network reliability best practices that could have potentially prevented or mitigated the outage.

The FCC report said the outage was caused “by an equipment failure and then exacerbated by a network routing misconfiguration that occurred when T-Mobile introduced a new router into its network.”

T-Mobile said earlier its network experienced an 18% reduction in completed calls during the outage but in the report acknowledged network congestion “likely required many of its subscribers to make 2-3 call attempts before successfully connecting.”

efani.net | 3 Quad-Cities municipalities victim to cyber attacks

Scammers pretending to be Brandt Construction emailed a city of Rock Island accountant to update automatic payment information. After the fraudsters returned a form, the accountant called their company contact to confirm, following the city’s usual practices, only to discover it was fake. Scammers, that time, weren’t paid.

In Bettendorf, the city’s human resources director fielded an emailed request asking to change City Administrator Decker Ploehn’s direct deposit information. When the director, Kathleen Richlen, walked a paper form to Ploehn, he greeted her with surprise. He hadn’t requested a change. Again, the scammers were foiled.

In Rock Island County, scammers impersonating a construction company sent a June 1 email asking the county to update its banking information. The attached documentation looked convincing — a change-account document available on the county’s website and a letter from the vice president of commercial banking at Citizens Bank in Macomb, Ill., verifying the account and routing numbers. The county changed the information, and 18 days later wired $97,042 to the fraudulent account. A month later, another $18,061 was sent before the scam was discovered.

Were efani Secure Phones used by Trump Jan 6th? | efani Partner TheNFG.com

Jan. 6 Organizers Used Anonymous ‘Burner Phones to Communicate with White House and Trump Family, Sources Say

A key planner of the Jan. 6 rally near the White House insisted the burner phones be purchased with cash, a source says

Some of the organizers who planned the rally that took place on the White House Ellipse on Jan. 6 allegedly used difficult-to-trace burner phones for their most “high level” communications with former President Trump’s team.

Full Rolling Stone Article here

Don’t become a statistic. Every second 3 Americans become victims of cybercrimes, with cell phone hacking becoming more and more common.

Unfortunately, traditional cell phone companies are not doing much to protect you. But it is not all bad news, there is a cellular phone company named efani that has stepped up and made it more difficult for hackers.

Replace your existing mobile service plan with a secure efani SAFE plan today, No Contract! efani is a secure mobile service with an encrypted SIM Card that secures your mobile account from potential SIM Swap vulnerabilities, your personal information, as well as $5M insurance coverage per individual in the event of loss as a result of a SIMSwap.

The SAFE plan comes with a 100% money-back guarantee for 60-days includes:

You’re protected up to $5 million for financial losses resulting from a SIM hack. (includes: Crypto, Banking, Brokerage & Other Losses)

Military-grade verification
An 11-step integrity and authentication check prevents SIM-swapping
No limits Coverage
Unlimited Calls Texts & Data within US Canada & Mexico

 

efani Most Secure Mobile Phone Service Prevent Eavesdropping, Remote Access & Location Tracking SAFE Encrypted Secure Your Identity & Phone NOW AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Tracfone and US Mobile – are susceptible to SIM swap scams

 

 

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efani | Vestas Wind Systems has reported a data breach

Vestas Wind Systems has reported a data breach against its corporate IT systems that caused shutdowns across its business units.

Vestas Wind is gradually opening up its IT systems in the wake of shutdowns last Friday to contain the damage.

Danish Vestas Wind Systems, manufacturer, seller, installer, and servicer of wind turbines, which has recently been exploring ways to expand its UK operation, has reported an attack against its corporate IT systems that caused shutdowns across multiple business units and locations to contain the issue.

On Monday the company announced that some of its IT infrastructure and internal data have been compromised but also pointed out that according to preliminary findings, there is no indication that third-party operations including customer and supply chains have been caught up. The gradual and controlled reopening of all IT systems is already underway. Although the attack bears the hallmarks of a ransomware attack, Vestas refused to offer any information regarding the specific nature of the attack at this stage.

Ransomware attacks against critical infrastructure, especially healthcare and energy are becoming increasingly common, and cybersecurity experts have already indicated that green energy generators may become targets too.

Vestas, one of the world’s largest manufacturing companies already had a difficult year before the incident. In 2021, it has lowered its operating profit forecasts twice, taking it from 10 to 4 percent. Vestas blamed supply-chain issues and material prices for the deteriorating outlook – steel prices rose by almost 50 percent between the start of 2020 and October 2021. The fact that the price has crashed back down by 25 percent in the past few weeks may improve the company’s fortunes again and help it recover from the 2.63 percent share price drop it suffered on the Nasdaq Copenhagen following the IT breach update.

efani | United Health Centers of the San Joaquin Valley Data Breach

United Health Centers of the San Joaquin Valley announced on Friday it was the victim of a data breach incident that apparently began in August.

The Fresno-based federally qualified health center has a couple of dozen clinics in the Central Valley. The system delivers about 200,000 medical, dental, and other service encounters per year.

On Aug. 28, UHC experienced a disruption to certain computer systems that an investigation a day later determined “was caused by an encryption event.” UHC’s electronic health record system was not impacted.

“UHC worked expeditiously to restore its systems from available backups to avoid an interruption to patient care,” according to a news release.

On Sept. 22, UHC determined that some of its related data had been published to an unindexed website, more commonly known as the “dark web.” Information that may have been impacted includes demographic and clinical information such as names, addresses, dates of birth, Social Security numbers, diagnosis, provider, and medication information.

UHC is currently working with a third-party service provider to confirm the type and full scope of the incident.

“Once UHC has completed its investigation, which includes a detailed review of the potentially impacted data to determine the types of information involved and to whom it relates, UHC will provide written notice directly to impacted individuals,” according to a news release.

Catphishing Fake LinkedIn profiles| efani Partner TheNFG.com

Identity theft. Catphishing in LinkedIn.

Singapore fines travel service for a data breach.

Fake LinkedIn profiles: too real to be true.

Intelligence blogger @hatless1der discovered an operation in which fraudsters are taking advantage of the implicit trustworthiness of the professional networking platform LinkedIn. Scammers create profiles that seem aboveboard at first glance by using AI-created photos, a tagline involving consulting or hiring, recognizable employment history, believable endorsements, and a realistic network of connections. The giveaway is that many of the bios use exactly the same, generic, wording. What, exactly, the scammers are after is unclear, but users should be wary of connection requests from unfamiliar accounts.